Barn siding

They say that style is cyclical. Maybe that’s why recycled barn wood siding is one of the hottest materials in interior decorating today. Simply put, barn siding is wood that comes from the exterior of old barns that are no longer functional. When the barns are dismantled, the wood is carefully extracted, dried in a kiln, and made ready for use. It may sound like a long way to go just for some lumber, but there are several reasons why more and more people are taking this route:

  1. Barn wood siding is strong. One of the key features of old barns is that they were built to last. The builders used the wood from old-growth trees, which are stronger and sturdier than the new-growth woods that are sold today. With barn siding, you can still get materials like redwood and Douglas fir? and you don’t have to feel bad about it!
  2. Barn siding is environmentally responsible. Because you’re rescuing wood that would otherwise have gone to the dump, you can feel good about using barn siding in your home.
  3. Barn wood siding is beautiful. Many homeowners turn to barn siding when they want to add a rustic charm to their home. Its rough texture and silvery patina comes from centuries of exposure to the elements, and adds a warm, inviting quality to your home, whether you use it for interior paneling, exterior siding, or cabinets and furniture.
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  1. Barn siding is unique. Depending on the type of wood, the location, and how it was used, no two pieces of barn siding will be the same. Each plank has its own unique story to tell. The varieties in color and texture of barn siding are part of the charm of barn wood siding—it’s not just decoration, it’s a conversation piece.

Although barn siding is a limited resource, and is therefore more expensive than other types of wood when adding to your home or building your shed, barn, or other outdoor structure, many homeowners are finding that these concerns weigh little when compared with all the value that barn wood siding can add to their homes.

Looking to calculate siding or barn costs for your next project, consult out True Cost Guides.


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