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How Much Does it Cost to Install Weather-stripping?

Install Weather-stripping Costs
Average reported costs
$245
based on 317 cost profiles
Most homeowners
spent between
$131 - $373
Low cost
$57
High cost
$700
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On This Page:

  1. Cost Factors
  2. What to Ask Your Handyman
  3. DIY Weather Stripping

Weather stripping is an effective and affordable way to keep your home cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Use this guide to outline the costs, materials and other important factors.

Cost Factors

Number of Windows & Doors

Before you purchase weather stripping materials, take note of the number of drafty windows and doors in your home. Once you have estimated the size of your project, it’s time to look at costs. Here’s what you can expect to pay per window and door:

  • Per interior door: $94
  • Per exterior door: $64
  • Per window: $103

According to HomeAdvisor’s True Cost Guide, most homeowners spend $243 on weather stripping their home. This is because homeowners tend to do more than one project at a time -- one door and window, two doors, two windows, etc. Check all of your windows and doors for leaks before you begin your project. Sealing multiple locations in your home at once will save you money.

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Weather stripping Materials

Weather stripping comes in several materials and designs. Here’s a quick list of the most popular materials.

Tapes. Weather stripping tape is inexpensive and perfect for filling oddly shaped gaps. You can cut the tape to size with scissors or a utility knife. Most tapes are also self-adhesive, making application simple and effective. Be sure to apply weather stripping tape only to clean surfaces.

  • Best used for: Door jambs, window jambs, window sashes, door bottoms.
  • Price: $7.87 for a 10-foot roll.
  • Pros: Good sealant, effective against wind. Cons: Low durability, highly visible, produces greenhouse gas emissions.

V-Strips. V-strips are thin, flexible strips of metal or vinyl. Metal v-strips are more affordable than vinyl options.

  • Best used for: Double-hung window jambs, tops and sides of doors.
  • Price: $6.81 for a 17-foot roll.
  • Pros: Durable, invisible, effective. Cons: Difficult to install.

Gaskets. Gaskets fit onto the bottom of doors and windows.

  • Best used for: Doorstops, window stops, inside window sashes, outside window sashes, door bottoms.
  • Price: $3.57 for a 17-foot roll.
  • Pros: Easy to install, low costs, self-adhesive. Cons: Visible.

Door sweeps. Door sweeps fit onto the bottom of a door and help eliminate under-door drafts.

  • Best used for: Interior and exterior door bottoms.
  • Price: $9.97.
  • Pros: Easy install, adjustable, reduces carpet drag. Cons: Price.

Magnetic. Magnetic weather strips fit into the top and sides of your doorjambs and create an airtight seal.

  • Best used for: Doors, double-hung windows and sliding window channels.
  • Price: $20 per strip.
  • Pros: Effective seal. Cons: Price.

Felt. Felt is an inexpensive, easy-to-install weather stripping material. You can cut felt with scissors or a utility knife. Some felt comes with a metal reinforcement.

  • Best used for: Doorjambs.
  • Price: $2.78 for a 17-foot roll.
  • Pros: Inexpensive, easy to install. Cons: Ineffective, susceptible to moisture, very visible.

Fin Seal. Fin seal weather strips have piles similar to carpet. Piled weather strips are perfect for sliding doors and windows.

  • Best used for: Sliding doors, sliding windows.
  • Price: $4.93 for 17 feet.
  • Pros: Durable. Cons: Difficult to install.

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Types of Windows & Doors

Weather stripping is priced by length. You will need to adjust your budget according to the design of your windows and doors. Here are the sizes of common window and door designs:

Doors: *(all measurements are written width by length)

  • Hinged doors: Hinged doors require weather stripping around the jamb. Be sure to include floor sweeps in your project. Standard measurements: 36 inches by 80 inches.
  • French doors: French doors need stripping around the jambs and areas where the two doors meet. Floor sweeps will also help insulate your home. Standard measurements: 30 inches by 80 inches, 32 inches by 80 inches, 34 inches by 80 inches, 36 inches by 80 inches, 48 inches by 80 inches, 60 inches by 80 inches, 72 inches by 80 inches.
  • Sliding glass doors: Sliding glass doors need weather stripping where the sliding portion of the door meets the jamb. It’s best to use piled stripping with sliding glass doors. Standard measurements: Sizes vary widely.
  • Garage doors: Garage door weather stripping goes along the exterior of the door’s opening. Also include an under-door weather guard to keep out water and seal the bottom of the door. Standard measurements: 8 feet by 7 feet, 9 feet by 7 feet, 10 feet by 7 feet.
  • Dutch Doors: Dutch doors need stripping around the jambs —similar to hinged designs — as well as beneath the top half of the door. Include floor sweeps to boost your door’s insulation value. Measurements: 30 inches by 80 inches, 32 inches by 80 inches, 36 inches by 80 inches.

Some custom and design-oriented doors differ in size. Make sure to measure your doors before you begin your project.

Windows:

  • Single-hung windows: Place weather stripping in the sash of the window. Standard measurements: 24 inches by 36 inches, 24 inches by 46 inches, 28 inches by 54 inches, 28 inches by 66 inches, 28 inches by 70 inches, 34 inches by 46 inches, 34 inches by 62 inches.
  • Side-sash and double-hung windows: These windows require weather stripping between the sash stiles and jamb. Standard measurements: 24 inches by 36 inches, 24 inches by 46 inches, 28 inches by 54 inches, 28 inches by 66 inches, 28 inches by 70 inches, 34 inches by 46 inches, 34 inches by 62 inches.
  • Casement windows: Casement windows require weather stripping on the top, bottom and sides of the inside of the window. Standard measurements: Twin casement windows run 21 inches by 45 inches and 21 inches by 53 inches. Single casement windows run 25 inches by 35 inches, 29 inches by 47 inches and 29 inches by 59 inches.
  • Awning windows: Place weather stripping on the side jambs of the window. Standard measurements: Standard sizes vary.
  • Bay windows: Place weather stripping between the sash stiles and jamb — similar to double-hung and side-sash windows. Standard measurements: Standard sizes vary.

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What to Ask Your Handyman

Installing weather stripping is sometimes a DIY-able job. But it’s a good idea to hire an expert to ensure professional results. Here are some questions to help you find the perfect pro for the job:

  • What’s your experience? Installing weather stripping isn’t always a simple job. Ask your potential pro about past projects — especially jobs similar to yours.
  • Do you have references? Credible pros will always have references. Ask to speak to at least three past clients before you make a hiring decision.
  • What will this job entail? Larger jobs sometimes require taking apart doors and windows. Ask your pro about the size of your job so you can prepare your home, schedule and budget.
  • How much do you charge? Understanding the cost of your project will help you budget and prioritize your needs.
  • How do you expect payment? Never pay a pro upfront for a job. Most pros will charge you by project milestone or once the job is completed.
  • How long will this job take? Weather stripping jobs vary in size and length. Speak to your pro about the timeline of your job before making a hiring decision.

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Do-it-Yourself Weather Stripping

If you have the experience, installing your own weather stripping is a simple DIY project. Here’s a helpful guide to get things started:

Installing door weather stripping:

Here are the tools and materials you’ll need:

  • Screwdriver
  • Tape measure
  • Hammer
  • Tin snips
  • Door sweep: $9.97
  • Self-adhesive foam weather stripping: $7.87 for a 10-foot roll.

Step 1: Clean your jambs with soapy water and let them dry.

Step 2: Measure and cut your weather stripping to fit the sides and top of the door.

Step 3: Peel the back from the foam and press it into the jamb.

Step 4: Measure the bottom of the door and cut your sweep to size.

Step 5: Close your door and screw the sweep onto your door, ensuring it’s in contact with the floor.

Installing window weather stripping:

Here are the tools and materials you’ll need:

  • Measuring tape
  • Utility knife
  • Self-adhesive weather stripping: $7.87 for foam-based adhesive tapes. $6.81 for v-strips.

Step 1: Clean the sashes and bottom of your window with soapy water and let them dry.

Step 2: Measure the sides, top and bottom of your window and cut your weather stripping accordingly.

Step 3: Apply the two pieces to the inner sash on each side of the window. (If you’re using v-strips, make sure the “v” is facing the inside of the window.)

Step 4: Lower the outer sash and apply weather stripping to each sash in the same manner.

Step 5: Raise your inner sash and apply weather stripping to the bottom.

Step 6: Lower the outer sash and apply weather stripping to the top.

If you have specialty or custom doors and windows, it’s best to hire a pro to apply your weather stripping.

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