How Much Does it Cost to Install a Septic Tank?

Install a Septic Tank Costs
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Average reported costs:
$5,995
based on 292 cost profiles
Most homeowners
spent between:
$4,872 - $7,118
Minimum cost:
$1,500
Maximum cost:
$10,999
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On average, septic tank installation costs $5,995, with most homeowners spending between $4,872 and $7,118. This data is based on actual project costs as reported by HomeAdvisor members.

If your home is not attached to a municipal sewer plant, then you likely have a septic system to collect your wastewater, then treat and dispose of it. This type of system requires a septic tank along with a soil absorption system that are installed underground. It can be tough for homeowners to predict what the cost to install a septic tank will be, they just know it's something that they have to do. Your first step should be to contact a reputable professional who can help you determine what will work best for you home and who can tell you what your particular project will cost. Once you've talked to a professional, the cost to install a septic tank will mostly depend on the type of tank you choose as well as your professional.

Concrete

Concrete tanks are the most common type of septic tank. The cost to install a septic tank made out of concrete is in the average price spectrum. These tanks are susceptible to cracking or separation, but are usually durable for a couple of decades. It's important to get these manually inspected regularly to ensure that cracks or runoff isn't occurring so that it can last as long as it should.

Steel

Steel septic tanks are the least durable and least popular tanks. They have covers that can corrode, which can lead to an unsuspecting person falling through the cover. The covers can be replaced separately, however, so that is something to consider. If you move into a home with an older steel tank, make sure to inspect the entire tank system.

Fiberglass

Fiberglass and plastic tanks are less vulnerable to the rusting and cracking of the other materials. The lower weight makes it more susceptible to structural damage, however, and it can shift in the soil.

Size

The cost to install a septic tank will depend a lot on the size of the tank. The bigger the tank, the higher the price will be because that means more digging and preparation for the tank.

Preparation

The cost to install a septic tank will increase depending on the amount of digging that needs to be done to prepare. This project usually requires a fair amount of excavation and can affect landscaping. Keep in mind, you may need to replace landscaping after the project.

Red tape

You might need to get a building permit for installing a septic system depending on the location and the complexity of the installation. This will increase the cost to install a septic tank, but will ensure everything is done according to code.

Labor

It's important to note that the labor is often as expensive, if not more, than the price of the tank itself. Working with a professional will certainly increase the cost to install a septic tank but is absolutely necessary to ensure that everything is correctly installed. Septic tank installation is a complicated process and one that could lead to a lot of damage and extremely pricey repairs if done incorrectly.
Overall, the cost to install a septic tank will largely depend on the pro you choose, and the type and size of tank you pick. Make sure to talk to at least three professionals before choosing someone to work with on your septic system.

 

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