How much will your project cost? Get Estimates Now

How Much Does It Cost To Repair A Septic Tank?

National Average Change Location | View National
$1,495
Typical Range
$640 - $2,352
Low End
$180
High End
$4,800

We are still gathering data for this location.

View national costs or choose another location.

Let's get local cost data for you. Where are you located?

Can we help you find Plumbing pros?

On This Page:

  1. Costs and Payment Methods
  2. Types of Repairs
  3. Quick Definition
  4. Signs of Repair
  5. Prevention Steps
  6. Conclusion

If you're like most people, you probably don't think much about your septic system very often, and you might take it for granted that, when you flush a toilet, take a shower, or turn off the sink faucet, the dirty water disappears into a hidden series of drains and pipes. In fact, properly installed septic systems last for years before showing signs of age or damage. When disaster strikes in the form of a broken pipe or sewage buildup in the yard, however, you'll be thinking about your system quite a bit: it's time to consider whether to replace or repair the septic tank.

Costs and Paying for It

The cost of septic tank repair will be between $640 and $2,352, though the price varies from region to region. Some factors that increase or decrease the cost includes materials and labor. Intensive repairs that require digging up large areas of ground cost more than simple repairs like replacing a filter. Tanks located on a slope may cost more to repair than tanks resting on flat land if the slope forces the workers to take extra precautions. Similarly, in regions where the ground freezes during the winter, workers may need to rent additional equipment and spend more time accessing the system than those working in milder climates where the ground is not as firm. Other cost factors include:

  • Septic tank construction material
  • Location of the damage within the system
  • Type of soil on the property
  • Local requirements for permits
  • Type of system

In some municipalities, the local health department or environmental agency may have funds available to assist homeowners with major septic repairs. This is because a damaged septic system is considered a health hazard. These agencies may offer tax credits or low-interest loans for those in need, especially in the event of an emergency. Check with your local municipality to determine if financial assistance is available for certain types of septic work.

Return to Top

Types of Repairs

Septic tank repairs range from replacing the bacteria inside a system to replacing broken pipes or digging a new drain field. Due to the nature of a septic tank and what it does, septic repairs are serious projects best left to licensed, insured professionals who fully understand the construction and composition of the system. Here are three common types of repairs and what they entail.

Broken Pipe

Septic systems use pipes to carry household waste to the tank and wastewater from the tank to the drain field. Pipes may break when wayward tree roots grow into them, the soil surrounding the pipe shifts, or the pipe material deteriorates. If not repaired, a broken septic pipe leads to bigger — and costlier — problems. The costs of these repairs vary depending on the location of the pipe and the extent of the damage, but prices average around $1,495.

drain field Failure

The septic system's drain field — the section of land reserved to filter water from the septic tank — does not last forever. If the top and bottom layers inside the tank grow so thick that they leave little space for water, grease and solid waste will slip into the drain field. This clogs the soil in the leaching area, which lets contaminated water and waste rise to the surface. Sometimes naturally occurring microbes clog the soil to such a degree that the only option is to dig a new drain field. Depending on the size of the drain field and the type of soil on the property, this costs between $7,200 and $20,000 on average.

Replacing Bacteria in an Aerobic Unit

Aerobic septic treatment units use an aeration system to break down waste faster than traditional anaerobic units. The bacteria in these units sometimes die when they go unused for a period of time, forcing homeowners to replace the bacteria so the system works properly again.

Return to Top

Quick Definition of Septic Tank

A septic system is an underground sewage treatment network of pipes and other components that are commonly used in rural areas that do not have access to municipal sewer services. The septic tank — a watertight box made from concrete or reinforced fiberglass — is the part of the system that holds and disposes of household waste. When waste enters the tank, organic material floats to the surface of the water inside the tank, where bacteria turn it into a liquid and leave solid material to fall to the bottom of the tank and form a layer of sludge. The leftover water then moves to a separate absorption area in the yard.

Return to Top

Signs You Need a Repair to Your Tank or System

The earliest sign of potential septic problems is the smell of sewage permeating from the septic tank or drain field. Some homeowners discover raw sewage backing up in sinks and bathtubs or notice problems when flushing toilets. In extreme situations, homeowners may find raw sewage or foul-smelling water seeping through the ground in the drain field. When this happens, it's time to call in the professionals for assistance.

Return to Top

Steps to Prevent the Need for Repairs

Regular septic tank maintenance helps homeowners detect potential repairs at the first signs of damage to prevent unnecessary and costly repairs. One way to do this is to hire a professional to pump the tank each year. This prevents scum and sludge buildup and provides an opportunity to inspect the system for potential issues. Expect to pay close to $400 to pump the system and between $100 and $200 for an inspection.

Another way to prevent problems is to reduce the load on the drain field. You can start by conserving water through restricting the number of toilet flushes each day or installing composting or high-efficiency toilets. Diverting water from the washing machine so that it does not drain into the septic tank is also helpful, as dirty laundry water contains lint from clothes that clogs the drain field and additives like detergent and bleach that can kill the necessary bacteria inside the tank.

You also need to avoid disposing of garbage through the septic system. Items like cigarette butts, diapers, dental floss, and other plastic pieces do not break down in the septic tank and get stuck floating inside. Oil and grease also clog the system because they do not dissolve in the water.

Return to Top

Conclusion

Dealing with septic problems is not a pleasant experience for any homeowner. Performing regular maintenance on your septic system and taking care of necessary repairs as needed helps keep the system running efficiently and extends its life expectancy.

Return to Top

Was this page helpful?

Was this page helpful?

How could this page be more helpful?


Share your cost experience

Help others plan and budget for their projects

Tony Paredes More than 1 year ago
This made me realize that we needed to contact some one to come and look into our problem.  

Find Septic Tank & Well Services Near You

How do we get this data?

  1. Homeowners visit HomeAdvisor.com to find a top-rated pro to complete their home improvement project or repair.

  2. Once their projects are completed, the members log in to their accounts and complete a short cost survey.

  3. After compiling and organizing the data, we report it back to you.