How Much Does a Sink Installation Cost?

Install a Sink Costs
Average reported costs
$660
based on 144 cost profiles
Most homeowners
spent between
$241 - $1,080
Low cost
$140
High cost
$2,306
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A new sink can dramatically change the look, feel and functionality of a room. It is something you'll use every day and often several times a day. It's important to choose a style that you're comfortable using as well as one that enhances the overall décor of your home. Keep these considerations in mind as you add up costs and plan for your sink installation.

Sink Styles & Installation Costs

If you've never shopped for a new sink before, you might be surprised at the number of options available and how incredibly diverse they are. Installation costs, including fixtures and labor, also vary greatly depending on the style of sink, the complexity of the job, and the contractor. On average, homeowners report paying $660. Most spend between $241 and $1,080 to have a sink added or replaced. Make sure to choose a style that's both functional and aesthetically pleasing.

Farmhouse/Apron Sinks: Farmhouse sinks lend a distinctly vintage look to your home, thanks to their classic charm. They have a wide front panel that drops down over the edge of the countertop. They also jut out a bit from the surrounding counter and require specialized base cabinets for adequate support. This design requires a more extensive installation that costs about $240.
Photo courtesy of TGI HomeCrafters, LLC in Scottsdale, AZ
Vessel Sinks: These sinks are a distinctive home décor choice that's especially appropriate for spa-like bathrooms. They sit directly on top of the surrounding countertop. Installation is typically around $200.Undermount Sinks: These lack the distinctive lip that's associated with more traditional styles. Undermount sinks are mounted under the countertop and sealed with a high strength epoxy or durable silicone caulk to prevent leaking. This installation costs about $230.

Drop-In Sinks: These sinks are just like their name suggests. They are easily inserted into the countertop with a rim that extends around the edge of the basin on all sides. Installation is quick and simple, with an average price tag of about $195.

Photo courtesy of Alicia Carter in Moorpark, CA
Pedestal Sinks: These sinks stand on their own, separate from any countertop. They were popular in the early 1900s and have gained popularity again recently. Though it looks like the pedestal sink is supported by its base, the wall actually takes the majority of the weight. Installation costs about $210.

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Sink Materials

Many homeowners coordinate sinks with other elements in the room, such as countertops, tiles, or appliances. However, you can also opt for a model with a unique material that stands apart from its surroundings. Some common material options include:

  • Stainless Steel: Simple and versatile, this is a common go-to for kitchens, where the sink easily matches with stainless steel appliances. Though stainless steel is  easy to clean, it does show water spots and may scratch. Costs range from $100 to $800.
  • Composite: This material is durable and chip-resistant. Though the color of composite sinks extends throughout the material, scratches may still show on darker surfaces. Costs average between $300 and $600.
  • Cast Iron: One of the most durable materials, cast iron is typically finished with hard porcelain enamel. Though cast iron  is easy to clean and long-lasting, the finish can chip over time. Cast iron sinks are also extremely heavy. These cost $300 to $900.
  • Quartz: Made to match quartz countertops, these sinks are a sleek and aesthetically appealing option. Dark quartz does show scratches, though. Costs average between $800 and $1,200.
  • Solid Surface: This material  is extremely durable, and since it’s color extends through the entire sink, scratches don't show easily. Solid surface sinks don’t tolerate heat well, however, and they may crack from heavy impact. They  must also be installed professionally, along with a solid surface countertop. Solid surface materials can range from $25 to $50 per square foot and sinks can range from $2,100 to $3,400.
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Kitchen Sink Prices

Kitchen sink prices can vary by hundreds of dollars depending on the size, finish and installation type.

Dimensions

Material

Sink Type

Bowl Configuration

Price

18 x 30 inches

Stainless Steel

Undermount

Single Bowl

$300

21.6 x 29.7 inches

Cast Iron

Farmhouse

Single Bowl

$825

22 x 33 inches

Cast Iron

Drop-in

Double Equal

$250

22 x 33 inches

Stainless Steel

Drop-In or Undermount

Single Bowl

$270

24 x 20 inches

Composite with Truffle Finish

Undermount

Single Bowl

$260

22 x 33 inches

Composite with Mocha Finish

Drop-In

Double Bowl

$425

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Other Factors to Consider

  • Kitchen sinks installed seamlessly with solid surface countertops can’t be purchased separately.

  • Deep kitchen bowls might look like good places to keep piles of dishes, but the weight may strain your back or steel cabinet space beneath.

  • Water treatment accessories for drinkable water come at an additional cost.

  • Extra-wide sinks require special base cabinetry, more extensive installations and additional expenses.

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Bathroom Sink Prices

Though bathroom space is generally more limited, your sink options aren't. There are many options to consider.

Dimensions

Material

Sink Type

Price

10.25 x 16.5 inches

Porcelain

Drop-In

$40

19.25 x 16.25 inches

Vitreous China

Undermount

$85

15 x 19 inches

Vitreous China

Pedestal

$160

6.125-inch Diameter

White Glass

Vessel

$215

22.5 x 16 inches

Composite with Wheat Finish

Undermount

$200

17.5 x 17.5 inches

Cast Iron with Blue Finish

Drop-In

$390

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Other Factors to Consider

  • Pedestal sinks sacrifice precious storage space in small bathrooms.

  • Added material choices like delicate but costly glass and affordable vitreous china create a wide range of price points for bathroom sinks.

  • Consider upgrading other bathroom elements like the tile, vanity, toilet or light fixtures to coordinate with the look of your new sink.

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Replacing Your Existing Sink

Getting rid of an old sink isn't as easy as you may imagine. Your existing installation is likely large and unwieldy, so you may want to pay an experienced contractor to dispose of it. If you're replacing an old fixture, you may have other added costs to consider. These can include:

  • Existing Sink Removal: $20 to $70
  • Sink Debris Disposal: $20 to $25

When replacing your existing sink, you also need to keep in mind what your bathroom looks like. What is the theme, color or style of the room? You don’t want to mix and match styles that clash with one another. For example, stainless steel might not match an old-fashioned bathroom, whereas porcelain doesn’t do well in a modern bathroom. Colors and styles are crucial when considering what type of sink to replace your old one with.

You can also find a cheap replacement sink online and then pay a plumber to install it if you don’t want to go through the whole process of having a professional pick one for you.

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Installation Size and Location

Consider the size of the room and purpose for the sink before you begin shopping. Kitchens with less than 150 square feet of space should stick with a single-bowl model measuring 22 x 24 inches. If you have the space, a multi-bowl model offers added functionality with separate areas for washing and rinsing. These sinks typically have equal depths on both sides. Costs increase 5 to 10 percent for models with differing bowl depths.

If you're remodeling an entire bathroom, laundry room or kitchen you can make your sink fit the space. If you're replacing an existing one, the cheapest option is to stick with a new sink of the same size. Cutting or reshaping the countertop will add to your installation expenses.

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Additional Features

Installing a new sink isn't as straightforward as it seems. Many additional expenses can pop up and add to the total cost of the process. These may include:

  • Garbage disposal installation
  • Premium for custom colors
  • Plumbing upgrades
  • Faucets and other related fixtures
  • Soap dispensers, spray hoses and other accessories
  • Drain strainers
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Hiring a Plumber

With so many installation expenses to consider, it's tempting to choose the most affordable plumber you can find, or attempt installation yourself. Installing a new sink is no small task, so it's best left to the professionals. In addition to a hiring a plumber, you may also need an electrician for remodeling that includes electric fixtures, and a contractor for cabinets and other features.

Request quotes from several plumbers and ask the right questions when you call. Be sure to ask about the following:

  • Experience and accreditation: All plumbers must be accredited. Make sure the company you choose has experience with new installations and not just repairs.
  • Insurance and warranties: An insured plumber is a safer bet because you're covered if something goes wrong. A warranty or guarantee helps protect your installation as well.
  • References: Ask around for personal references, or search for online reviews.

Don't skimp on a new sink installation. This is a home fixture you'll likely keep for decades and one that can add great value to your home.

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