Disability Accommodation Cost Guides

Disability accommodations cost $200 to $20,000 or more. Upgrades range from quick repairs, like elevator repairs for $350 or installing a new elevator for $5,000 or more. You also want to consider upgrades for the sight, hearing and cognitively impaired, which can range from $200 to $5,000 for each upgrade.

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  • Build a Disability Ramp
    National Average $2,055
    Typical Range $988 - $3,122
    Low End - High End $400 - $5,000
  • Install an Elevator
    National Average $4,118
    Typical Range $2,532 - $5,704
    Low End - High End $600 - $12,000
  • Remodel for Disability Accommodation
    National Average $4,353
    Typical Range $783 - $7,922
    Low End - High End $130 - $18,000

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Disability Accommodation
Build a Disability Ramp
(666 projects)
$2,055 Average National Cost
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Disability Accommodation
Install an Elevator
(340 projects)
$4,118 Average National Cost
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Disability Accommodation
Remodel for Disability Accommodation
(328 projects)
$4,353 Average National Cost
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Disability Accommodation
Repair an Elevator or Stair Lift
(166 projects)
$336 Average National Cost
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Disability Accommodation
Get a Building Permit
(105 projects)
$1,305 Average National Cost
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Disability Accommodation
Repair a Wheelchair Ramp
(32 projects)
$1,052 Average National Cost
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How Much Does It Cost to Build an Accessible House?

Building a completely accessible home costs $100 to $300 per square foot. Most modern homes already follow guidelines for wheelchair accessible doors and hallways. You’ll save money by building only on one level and considering all disabilities when constructing. Pricing varies by location and disability. Talk to a local ADA contractor for a consultation and quote today.

Cost to Retrofit a House for Accessibility

Retrofitting your home for accessibility cost $4,500 on average. But it’ll range depending on your home, location and the type of disability. The following cost guides break down pricing for each part of a renovation.

How to Make a House Wheelchair Accessible?

Ramp $1,000 - $3,000
Doorways $700 - $2,500
Stair Lift $1,500-$5,000
Elevator $2,500 - $60,000
Lowering Cabinets $1,500 - $8,500
Widening Halls $30,000 - $40,000

Ramps

Installing or repairing a ramp for accessibility costs $100 to $200 per linear foot. You can also purchase removable, temporary and portable ramps for $200 to $5,000. You’ll need to find out what municipal building codes, apply to ramps outside your home or building.

Doorways

Widening a doorway costs $700 to $2,500 per door. Interior doors cost less, but exterior doors on modern homes already have enough clearance.

Stairs and Elevators

Stair lifts, elevators and railings cost $1,000 to $60,000 to install, but only a few hundred dollars to fix. You’ll need these for retrofitting for persons with mobility impairments or wheelchairs.

Kitchen

Remodeling a kitchen costs $13,000 to $38,000. It’ll cost the same for either accessibility reasons or just to update the look.

Hallways

Widening a hallway costs $30,000 to $40,000. It’s often more reasonable to build new or consider opening your floorplan to eliminate hallways. You’ll need to hire a local structural engineer or architect.

Bathroom

Remodeling a bathroom to accommodate various disabilities costs $3,000 to $15,000, or $9,000 on average. Bathroom renovations cost $6,000 to $15,000 on average for aesthetic upgrades, so it’s a good time to combine the two.

ADA Accommodations for Home Office

ADA accommodations for your home office cost $50 to $5,000. Some of this cost might come from your employer. Many home accommodations aren’t covered by insurance but might get you a tax break. Talk to your employer and your accountant about options and costs before investing.

DIY vs. Hiring a Professional ADA Contractor

Due to regional variations in code requirements and federally mandated disability accommodations, you’ll want to at least discuss options with a contractor. Throughout your remodel, you’ll likely want to hire multiple contractors if you’re acting as your own general contractor. To turn the project over to the pros, start with a local architect or general contractor near you.